Tag Archives: Bible

blackout poem

Looking out and looking up and most of all looking back

Sometimes I write poetry. Sometimes the Bible writes poetry. Sometimes we write poetry together. Over the past few weeks, two people who don’t know each other and who I haven’t been great about keeping in touch with have both suggested that I should read through the story of the Exodus, because God’s rescue and the […]

For dust you are, by Patrick Feller via Flickr.

Women of Lent: Do Whatever He Tells You

During advent, I wrote a popular series on my old blog called “Women of Advent” about the women who waited with expectation for the promised Messiah, the women who inhabited the meaning of advent. Someone recently suggested that I do a similar series for the next-most-popular season in the church calendar, Lent. I’ve been doing […]

Photo Via April-Mo on Flickr

Travelin’ Tuesdays: What does this mean?

Can you believe it’s Tuesday again already? We’re back with another Travelin’ Tuesdays post (be sure to check out the rest of them while you’re here!) and an announcement. I know this will be tragic news to some of you, but we’re going to take a brief hiatus from the Tuesdays that Travel during Lent. […]

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Travelin’ Tuesdays: “Go at Once.”

  Sometimes I wish I heard God as clearly as Jonah did. But sometimes I also wonder if I would do exactly what Jonah did even when God literally spoke to him with some pretty unquestionable language:¬†Go at once to Ninevah. Because in this broken world, even when the creator God calls us by name […]

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Travelin’ Tuesdays: Brought Back Empty

Aaaand we’re back with another Travelin’ Tuesdays post! This one even features a woman. Click on the category “Travelin’ Tuesdays” to see the other posts in this series. Some people travel for adventure, some people travel to see the world, some people travel because they are searching for something, and some people travel because they […]

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For My Name’s Sake

“Stupid ****.” I turned around slowly and surveyed the fourth graders seated at my table. They were staring at me with wide eyes, shocked at what had been said and holding their breath to see my reaction. I tried to gauge their faces, to guess who had said it. Finally, a controlled but angry whisper […]